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9.21.2009

Kuraoka Says to Know: Rudy Autio






Rudy Autio was born in Butte, Montana, studied at MSU Bozeman where he befriended Peter Voulkos, helped found the Archie Bray Foundation in Helena Montana, and started the ceramics department at University of Montana, Missoula. Needless to say, he was an incredibly influential ceramic artist of the 20th century. His work is marked by giant, sculptural vessels wrapped in Matisse-inspired illustrations of reaching figures and cantering horses. I like them well enough, but I am sure a face-to-face introduction would find me more greatly wooed by Autio's work.

(images via artist's website and AskArt; portrait via Distinctly Montana)

4 comments:

onegrandhome said...

I'm not loving it, honestly. The forms are fine and the applied decoration is fine but they seem to really fight one another. I feel as though the painting would be better suited to a canvas.

But what do I know?

Jesse Lu said...

You know Alexis, I have to agree. I am not a fan. I was being nice with my words... but I realized, this is my blog. And I can say whatever the hell I damn please. Thanks for reminding me! :)

onegrandhome said...

Funny how self-censorship creeps up on you, doesn't it? The politesse of being a blogger gets stifling. Rock on.

Angel Artist said...

I like what Autio has done. Lately, I have been looking at majolica, and this is a marriage of ideas of decorating a functional piece (in this case a vessel that is not a traditional shape like a plate or bowl). It may be that the subject content is not my favorite, but then I'm not a man. The body-like forms covered with women and horses is like seeing a simplistic inward life of the vessel of man. Perhaps I'm over, or under, appreciating the depth of the work, but for my purposes I find the concepts at least are quite fascinating.

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